Emitir sonidos agudos con PowerShell

Emitir sonidos medios con PowerShell

Detectar un mensaje enviado en código Morse mediante sonidos utilizando la tarjeta de sonido y el programa SDRSharp

Script para enviar código Morse en PowerShell

El texto enviado en código morse es

El texto recibido en la tarjeta de sonido es

Explicación sobre el texto recibido en la tarjeta de sonido

Detectar una frecuencia de sonido emitida desde un dispositivo utilizando la tarjeta de sonido y el programa SDRSharp

Emitir la frecuencua de sonido a 1000 Hz desde PowerShell en un equipo:

Detectada la frecuencia de sonido en otro equipo con SDRSharp (SDR# rev 1491) utilizando el micrófono:

Detectada la frecuencia de sonido en otro equipo con SDRSharp (SDR# rev 1491) utilizando la entrada de audio:

Emitir un sonido por el altavoz del equipo

Beep function

 

Appending Data to a Text File

One use of the Add-Content cmdlet is to append data to a text file. For example, this command adds the words “The End” to the file C:\Scripts\Test.txt:

 

By default Add-Content tacks the new value immediately after the last character in the text file. If you’d prefer to have The End listed on a separate line, then simply insert n (Windows PowerShell lingo for “new line”) into the value being written to the file. In other words:

 

Seeing as how you asked, here are some of the other special characters that can be used in Windows PowerShell output:

 

Keep in mind that some of these characters are intended for use only from the Windows PowerShell prompt. For example, the special character a causes your computer to beep. Don’t believe us? Try this command and see what happens:

 

One nice feature of Add-Content is the fact that it accepts wildcard characters. For example, suppose you want to add a timestamp to the end of all the .log files in the C:\Scripts folder. This command will do just that:

 

As you can see, here we’re simply assigning the current date and time to a variable named $A, then appending the value of that variable to all of the .log files in C:\Scripts.

Morse code